New Books: June 2019

New releases for June!

Naturally Tan, Tan France, St. Martin’s June 2019

Mexico, Masks and Rituals Phyllis Galembo, D.A.P. May 2019

The Last Collection: A Novel of Elsa Schiaparelli and Coco Chanel, Jeanne Mackin, Berkeley; June 2019

Issues: a History of Photography in Fashion Magazines Vince Aletti, Phaidon May 2019

More Than Enough: Claiming Space for Who You Are (No Matter What They Say) Elaine Welteroth, Viking, June 2019

Job Posting: Full Time Archivist/Librarian at LIM College

LIM College – Where Business Meets Fashion is currently seeking candidates for the position of Archivist/Librarian.


Founded in 1939, LIM College educates students for success in the global business of fashion and its many related industries. As a pioneer in experiential education, LIM fosters a unique connection between real-world experience and academic study in business principles, offering master’s, bachelor’s and associate degree programs in a variety of fashion-focused majors. Located in the heart of New York City — the nation’s fashion and business capital — LIM provides students with innumerable opportunities for firsthand experience and professional development.

POSITION PURPOSE

The Archivist/Librarian is responsible for maintaining the College’s archive and library related duties as determined by the Director of Library Services.  This position includes working evenings and weekends.

ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS AND BASIC DUTIES

RESPONSIBILITIES

·         Developing policies and procedures regarding the archives

·         Processing and describing LIM College’s archives

·         Identifying materials relevant to the college’s history

·         Placing materials in appropriate archival housing

·         Writing and updating finding aids

·         Identifying items in need of conservation

·         Performing or overseeing the conservation processes

·         Assisting patrons with research that relates to the archives

·         Planning and implementing digitization of archive materials

·         Collaborating with other departments, particularly Institutional Advancement, by using archival materials to create LIM College-themed presentations

·         Staying abreast of archive and library trends through participation in local and national associations

·         Supervising work of library student workers

·         Analyzing patron requests to determine needed information and assisting in locating that information

·         Teaching patrons to search for information using research databases and other information sources

·         Teaching library information classes

·         Keeping statistics related to teaching information literacy classes

·         Checking books in and out of the library using the SIRSI library system

·         Explaining the use of library facilities, equipment and services

·         Offering and relating information about library policies

·         Assembling and arranging materials for displays

·         Keeping records of all library transactions

·         Assisting students with copy machines and printers

·         Weeding books, magazines and newspapers as needed

·         Responding to patron complaints and taking action as necessary

·         Compiling lists of new materials, such as books, periodicals and DVDs as needed

·         Assisting in Open House programs as needed

 

QUALIFICATIONS

 

·         A master’s degree in Library Science with a concentration in archive studies is required.

·         Candidates must have knowledge of all archive requirements and standards.

·         At least two (2) years archive and general library experience.

·         Basic computer and spread sheet application skills.

·         Basic ability to perform conservation repairs on materials as needed.

·         Good communication and marketing skills.

·         Familiarity with best practices in digitization of archival materials.

https://www.limcollege.edu/about-lim/careers

Summer Exhibitions

Taking some time off this summer? Traveling? Here are some museum fashion and textile exhibitions throughout the US these next few months.

Heading to NYC? Be sure to check out The Met’s Camp: Notes on Fashion “which examines how the elements of irony, humor, parody, pastiche, artifice, theatricality, and exaggeration are expressed in fashion.” This show runs through September 8. The Museum at FIT is exhibiting Minimalism/Maximalism through November 16. The show is “devoted to the historical interplay of minimalist and maximalist aesthetics as expressed through high fashion.”

Is a trip to Los Angeles in your summer plans? Two shows of interest are at the FIDM Museum. BA in Design is a student exhibition running through the end of June. Starting in mid-August, catch the Art of Television Costume Design. Over at LACMA, check out Power of Pattern, an exhibition of Asian ikat robes and panels until August 11.

If you’ll be traveling through the Midwest, take a detour to Kent State University in Ohio. Two exhibitions are up this summer. Focus: Fiber 2019 is juried exhibition of contemporary fiber art and Fashion Meets the Body highlights work from the University’s faculty.

Or stop over in Chicago to see Weaving Beyond the Bauhaus at the Art Institute of Chicago, opening at the beginning of August. MCA has two shows of interest: Jessica Campbell’s textile works (through July) and Virgil Abloh’s fashion (through September).

If you’re coming to my city, Philly, there are a few fashion treats awaiting you. Souls Grown Deep, to September, at the Philadelphia Museum of Art is an exhibition of Southern African American textiles and artwork. The Fabric Workshop has Sonya Clark on display through August and Bill Viola through October.

Head south and view both Asian textiles and Dior at the Dallas Museum of Art. Sheila Hicks is exhibiting at The Bass in Miami. Atlanta has two shows for textiles lovers: Hand to Hand showcases southern craft until August 4 and SCAD FASH has Mary Katrantzou on view until July 28.

Know of fashion, textile, or costume exhibitions in your neck of the woods? Share with us!

Call for Papers: Fashion in the Library

Manuscript Submission Deadline: December 1, 2019
Publication date: August 2021

Nature and Scope of the Issue
Certain fields are viewed as “for girls”–decorative arts, textiles, interior design, anyone?–and fashion is one of them. These “girl zones”  have traditionally not been considered worthy or serious fields of inquiry and practice like film, the fine arts, architecture, or music.“Girl zones” are not buttressed and validated by a discourse of mythic salvation and transcendence like the ones that benefit, for example, hip-hop or punk (i.e. music) or film. Academic inquiry into fashion and adjacent fields (and consideration for inclusion within Special Collections and archival environments) are very often ignored or belittled because they dare favor the feminine-coded body in opposition to the often masculine-coded mindset of what constitutes a valid subject of research and study.
Indeed, libraries and fashion, as both professions and fields of research, have more in common than might seem immediately apparent. Both fields are gendered spaces, typically coded feminine/female/femme. Because of their association with women and femme qualities, both libraries and fashion must justify their continued existence in ways the film industry, for example, never does. Both the fashion industry and the library field depend upon the passion and labor of women, yet have historically tended to reward male/masculine involvement and agency to a much greater degree. Though it is a given that the work of, for example, Alexander McQueen is of genius and worth saving, the work of the many seamstresses, pattern-makers, and “hands” within the industry is barely acknowledged; nor has the importance of women fashion journalists or editors been as documented and enshrined as that of men.

Starting in the 1990s, fashion studies began to emerge (in the wake of home economics’ name change) as an academic subject in its own right. Increasingly, attention is being paid to the importance of fashion history and practice in the study of gender, sexuality, ethnicity, and class.
In the early 21st century, fashion is a multibillion-dollar global industry and cultural force. Popular culture idioms like fast fashion outlets and reality shows bring fashion to a vast audience.
It is clear that the study of fashion and its role in shaping self and society will not go away, and the intersection of fashion and libraries will increasingly offer an increasingly productive vector for inquiry.
Questions this issue will consider include (but will not be limited to): what role does fashion play in library collections, outreach programs, and programming? Where does fashion belong in the library? In Special Collections? In the archives? Are three-dimensional objects allowed? Should or can libraries collaborate with museums? How do we ensure that spontaneous yet relevant intricacies of “vernacular style” and self-presentation are documented, studied, and given the respect that other less loaded forms of artistic and self-expression are given? We hope this issue will be highly interactive, exploratory, revelatory…and revealing.

List of Potential Topics

● Librarian Fashion Tropes
● Where Does Fashion Reside in the Library?
● Home Economics Collections
● “Women’s Work”
● Disappearance of Clothing Design/Textile/Apparel Programs at Land-Grant Universities
● The Bureau of Home Economics
● Documenting “Hand Work” (Seamstresses, Milliners, Pattern Designers) and Fashion-
Related Small Businesses
● Fashion Studies
● Fashion Bibliographies
● Fashion Librarians/hip
● Fashion (In) Special Collections
● Who Has Access to  Fashion Collections?
● Importance of Library Collections to Fashion Studies
● Researching Fashion (for Exhibits, Collections, Shows, Etc.)
● Fashion Histories
This list is by no means exhaustive! The editors are excited to consider and enthusiastically encourage the submission of perspectives and topics that haven’t occurred to them.

Instructions for Submission
The editors for the Fashion in the Library issue of Library Trends invite authors to submit full manuscripts by December 1, 2019. Manuscripts should be sent to bexlib [at] illinois [dot] edu with the subject line “Library Trends Submission.”
All submissions should follow the Library Trends formatting guidelines. Authors should use the Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition author-date format for citations and bibliography.
Manuscripts should include the author’s name, affiliation, and e-mail address. Editors will communicate with the only first author of co-authored manuscripts.
Authors will be notified of their manuscript’s acceptance status in late January 2020. The double-blind peer review process begins at the same time.
The Fashion in the Library issue’s publication date is August 2021.
Timeline
December 1, 2019          Manuscript Drafts Due
January 20, 2020            Peer Review Begins
April 30, 2020                  Peer Review Ends
May- August 30, 2020     Manuscript Revision Period
November 1,  2020          Final Manuscripts Due to Editors
August 2021                    Final Publication
Editors
Courtney Becks (MA, MALIS) is the Librarian for African American Studies and the Jewish Studies Bibliographer at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is a former blogger and sometime fashion zinester. She is co-directing the Fashion, Style, & Aesthetics Research Cluster through the Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities for the 2019-2020 school year. She can be reached at bexlib [at] illinois [dot] edu.
Cristina Favretto (MLS, CAS) joined the faculty of the University of Miami libraries in 2008 as the Head of Special Collections, where she curates collections documenting the history of Miami and South Florida, the Caribbean and South America, countercultural movements, artists’ books, architecture and art, and fashion. Before joining the Special Collections Department, Cristina has held a variety of posts throughout the country, including Head of Special Collections at San Diego State University, Curator of Rare Books at UCLA’s Charles E. Young Library, and Director of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History and Culture at Duke University.  She has also worked at the Boston Public Library, Harvard University Libraries, and the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh. She received her M.L.S. and C.A.S. (Certificate of Advanced Studies) at the University of Pittsburgh, and her B.A. in English Literature and Art History at the State University of New York at Albany. Cristina spent her formative years in Trieste, Italy, and received her Baccalaureate from the Liceo Giosuè Carducci in that city. She also has had a shadow life as a performance artist and lead singer in a post-punk cabaret band.

New Books: Spring 2019

Spring is here! Here are a few new Spring releases:

Yves Saint Laurent: a Biography, Laurence Benaim, Rizzoli Ex Libris March 2019

Killer Style: How Fashion Has Injured, Maimed, and Murdered Through History Alison Matthews David and Serah-Marie McMahon, OwlKids April 2019
Middle Grade Non-Fiction

The Indian Textile Sourcebook, Avalon Fotheringham, Thames and Hudson; April 2019

Putting On the Dog: the Animal Origins of What We Wear Melissa Kwasny, Trinity University Press April 2019

Costume Institute Exhibition + Gala

The Metropolitan Museum of Arts’ Costume Institute’s 2019 exhibition, Camp: Notes on Fashion opens May 9 and runs through September 8. The exhibit showcases hundreds of objects from the seventeenth century through today. Just what is camp? Watch the Met’s video on the exhibition to find out.

The exhibition theme is framed around Susan Sontag’s essay Notes on Camp (1964). You can freely download the essay from Monoskop. Sontag includes clothing as a large part of camp, “emphasizing texture, sensuous surface, and style at the expense of content.”  Observer reviewed the exhibit and highlights some of the campiest of costumes included.

Of course, you can also see how celebrities interpreted the camp theme at last night’s Gala. Vogue and CNN have plenty of photos from the red carpet. Find out what camp means to Billy Porter.

Follow the hashtag #MetCamp and get a copy of the catalog for your library!

 

New Books: Winter 2019

Just a few new Fashion, Textiles, and Costume titles you may have missed:

Textiles, Community, and Controversy: The Knitting Map Jools Gilson and Nicola Moffat, Bloomsbury January 2019

Pictorial Embroidery in England: A Critical History of Needle Painting and Berlin Work Rosika Desnoyers, Bloomsbury February 2019

Fashion, History, Museums: Inventing the Display of Dress Julia Petrov, Bloomsbury February 2019

I.M: a Memoir Isaac Mizrahi, MacMillion February 2019

Global Perspectives on Sustainable Fashion Allison Gwilt, Alice Payne, and Evelise Anicet Ruthschilling, Bloomsbury February 2019