Must See: Fall Exhibitions

There are several must see exhibitions this fall and I wanted to share a few with the group. These are listed in order by the date in which they end.

fidm

Man Mode: Dressing the Male Ego

Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising Museum

August 2, 2016 to December 23, 2016

Ego! It comes across loud and clear through a man’s wardrobe. Boldness and confidence translate into strong silhouettes, dominant colors, and militant embellishment. Victorian aesthetes were impeccably tailored, showcasing mastery of sartorial connoisseurship. The educated gent’s prowess for art and sportsmanship were revealed through his neckwear and shoes: Ascot or bow tie today? Wing-tips or spectators? Embracing innovation–cutting-edge textiles and space-age silhouettes–meant a mid-century man could inhabit out-of-this world concepts. Modern hipsters pair straight-off-the-runway fast fashion with vintage or eco couture to express a calculated interest in fashion. From the bedroom to the ballroom and the office to the outfield–male egos demand attention! ManMode: Dressing the Male Ego presents three centuries of menswear from the FIDM Museum collection.

(Photo and exhibition details: http://fidmmuseum.org/exhibitions/current/#man-mode-dressing-the-male-ego)

mfa-boston

Gold and the Gods: Jewels of Ancient Nubia

Museum of Fine Arts Boston

July 19, 2014 to January 8, 2017

This dazzling exhibition focuses on the Museum’s world-class collection of jewelry from Ancient Nubia (located in what is now Sudan). The Nubian adornments housed at the MFA constitute the most comprehensive collection outside Khartoum. As the conduit between the Mediterranean world and lands south of the Nile Valley, Nubia was known for its exotic luxury goods—especially gold. “Gold and the Gods” focuses on excavated ornaments from an early 20th-century expedition by the Museum with Harvard University, dating from 1700 BC to 300 AD, including both uniquely Nubian and foreign imports, prized for their materials, craftsmanship, symbolism, and rarity. “Gold and the Gods” includes more than one hundred treasures, including a gilt-silver mummy mask of Queen Malakaye and the famous Hathor-headed crystal pendant. The MFA is the only US museum able to mount an exhibition devoted solely to Nubian adornment drawing exclusively on its own collection.

(Photo and exhibition details: http://www.mfa.org/exhibitions/gold-and-gods)

risd

Whirling Return of the Ancestors: Egúngún Masquerade Ensembles of the Yorùbá

Rhode Island School of Design Museum

July 15, 2016 to January 8, 2017

Whirling Return of the Ancestors celebrates the rich and varied artistry of the ensembles worn in Egúngún masquerades—performances that celebrate the power and presence of ancestral spirits among Yorùbá peoples of West Africa. In this installation, works on loan from Brown University’s Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology are presented alongside a magnificent, newly commissioned ensemble from Yorùbá artisans in Benin.

Crochet Coral Reef: TOXIC SEAS

Museum of Arts and Design

September 15, 2016 to January 22, 2017

Crochet Coral Reef: TOXIC SEAS celebrates the tenth anniversary of the “Crochet Coral Reef” (2005–present), an ongoing project by sisters Margaret and Christine Wertheim and their Los Angeles–based organization, the Institute For Figuring. Mixing crocheted yarn with plastic trash, the work fuses mathematics, marine biology, feminist art practices, and craft to produce large-scale coralline landscapes, both beautiful and blighted. At once figurative, collaborative, worldly, and dispersed, the “Crochet Coral Reef” offers a tender response to the dual calamities facing marine life: climate change and plastic trash.

(Photo and exhibition details: http://madmuseum.org/exhibition/crochet-coral-reef-toxic-seas)

the-met

The Secret Life of Textiles: Animal Fibers

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

August 15, 2016 to February 20, 2017

The second in the Secret Life of Textiles exhibition series, this installation features works of art made from the most important animal fibers—wool, hair, silk, and feathers—by numerous cultures throughout history and in different regions of the world. The objects on view include fibers from sheep, camelids, goats, yaks, horses, cows, and other small animals; silk filament from cultivated or wild silk worms; and feathers.

The exhibition includes a rich selection of reference materials reflecting the transformation of animal fibers through the use of technology. It also reveals the expertise of conservators in fiber identification using advance microscopy.

(Photo and exhibition details: http://metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2016/animal-fibers)

MoMA Releases Free Online Archive

The MoMA recently announced that they have released a free online archive that goes back to their first exhibit in 1929. The archive includes over 3,500 exhibits and over 30,000 exhibition images.

In addition to the new archive, the museum also has over 70,000 pieces of art available to view online for free.

You can view the new archive here.

You can view the individual pieces online here.

Textile Exhibitions

There are a couple of textile exhibitions at The Metropolitan Museum of Art that I wanted to share with everyone. If you have the opportunity to go, I highly recommend them.

Chinese Textiles: Ten Centuries of Masterpieces from the Met Collection

This installation, which explores the cultural importance of silk in China, showcases the most important and unusual textiles from the Museum’s collection. In addition to three rare pieces dating from the Tang dynasty (618–906), when China served as a cultural hub linking Korea and Japan to Central and West Asia, and ultimately to the Mediterranean world, the exhibition also includes eleventh- and twelfth-century tapestries from Central Asia, as well as contemporaneous Chinese examples of this technique.

Spectacular embroideries—including an imperial fourteenth-century canopy decorated with phoenixes and flowers, and a monumental late seventeenth- or early eighteenth-century panel showing phoenixes in a garden—are also on view, together with theatrical garments, court costumes, and early examples of badges worn at court to designate rank.

Exhibition Ends: June 19

Description is from The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s website.

The Secret Life of Textiles: Plant Fibers

Fibers are the most important components of a textile. Everything related to the production of a textile—yarns, dyes, weaving, and patterns—begins with and is determined by the type and quality of the fibers. At The Met, the Museum’s comprehensive textile collection, the conservators’ expertise, and state-of-the-art analytical instrumentation come together to make possible a detailed examination of fiber characteristics and technology through a series of three installations that will be focused on plant fibers, animal fibers, and synthetic fibers.

This first installation in the series will reveal the technological transformation and beauty of the most important plant fibers—linen, hemp, ramie, and cotton—used by various cultures around the world in North Africa, Europe, Asia, and the Americas, from the Dynastic period of Egypt to the present day.

Exhibition Ends: July 31

Description is from The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s website.

 

 

Summer Exhibitions around New York City

One of the best ways to keep cool during a New York City summer is by spending an afternoon at a museum. Here are a few exhibitions that are going on this summer that relate to fashion, costume, and textiles.

Metropolitan Museum of Art

China: Through the Looking Glass*

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Exhibition Dates: May 7 – August 16, 2015

This exhibition explores the impact of Chinese aesthetics on Western fashion and how China has fueled the fashionable imagination for centuries. In this collaboration between The Costume Institute and the Department of Asian Art, high fashion is juxtaposed with Chinese costumes, paintings, porcelains, and other art, including films, to reveal enchanting reflections of Chinese imagery.

From the earliest period of European contact with China in the sixteenth century, the West has been enchanted with enigmatic objects and imagery from the East, providing inspiration for fashion designers from Paul Poiret to Yves Saint Laurent, whose fashions are infused at every turn with romance, nostalgia, and make-believe. Through the looking glass of fashion, designers conjoin disparate stylistic references into a pastiche of Chinese aesthetic and cultural traditions.

The exhibition features more than 140 examples of haute couture and avant-garde ready-to-wear alongside Chinese art. Filmic representations of China are incorporated throughout to reveal how our visions of China are framed by narratives that draw upon popular culture, and also to recognize the importance of cinema as a medium through which to understand the richness of Chinese history.

*Image and exhibition information is from the Metropolitan Museum of Art website.

Museum of Arts and Design

Ralph Pucci: The Art of the Mannequin*

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Exhibition Dates: March 31 – August 30, 2015

Ralph Pucci: The Art of the Mannequin will be the first museum exhibition to explore the work of renowned New York-based designer Ralph Pucci, who is widely regarded for his innovative approach to the familiar form of the mannequin. Having collaborated with luminaries such as Diane von Furstenberg, Patrick Naggar, Andrée Putman, Kenny Scharf, Anna Sui, Isabel and Ruben Toledo and Christy Turlington, Pucci’s mannequins not only expand the parameters of this ubiquitous sculptural form, but reflect major cultural trends of the past three decades.

As Pucci was building his business in the 1970s, the notion of the “super model”—the living mannequin with a personality—emerged. Pucci captured this catalytic moment in his work, finding inspiration from sources as varied as Greek and Roman statues and the performance costumes of the New York Dolls. Pucci personified the previously anonymous form in new and challenging ways, creating visions of physical beauty that were more specific, empowered, and diverse than the fashion industry had previously allowed. More than commercial armatures or sculptural forms, his mannequins became agents of change in our attitudes to the body, to fashion, and to individual identity.

The Art of the Mannequin will include over 30 of Pucci’s most important mannequins, as well as an in-gallery recreation of his sculpture studio. Pucci’s master sculptor and longtime collaborator, Michael Evert, will be in residence during the exhibition’s run to give visitors a first-hand look at the creative process, from initial modeling in clay to the rendering of the fiberglass end-product. In conjunction with the installation of mannequins the renowned designers Isabel and Ruben Toledo will curate a selection of jewelry from MAD’s collection which will be installed on Ruben’s famous surrealist jewelry mannequins.

*Image and exhibition information is from the Museum of Arts and Design website.

Museum of the Moving Image

Matthew Weiner’s Mad Men*

mad men

 

Exhibition Dates: March 14 – September 6, 2015

This new major exhibition explores the creative process behind Mad Men, one of the most acclaimed television series of all time, now launching its final seven episodes on AMC. Featuring large-scale sets including Don Draper’s office and the kitchen from the Draper’s Ossining home, more than 25 iconic costumes, props, video clips, advertising art, and personal notes and research material from series creator Matthew Weiner, the exhibition offers unique insight into the series’ origins, and how its exceptional storytelling and remarkable attention to period detail resulted in a vivid portrait of an era and the characters who lived through it. The Museum’s exhibition marks the first time objects relating to the production of Mad Men will be shown in public on this scale.

To avoid lines on weekend days, visitors are encouraged to arrive before 2:00 p.m.

*Image and exhibition information is from the Museum of the Moving Image website.

Unique Gem in the City of Paris

museum shotFor those with summer travel plans to the fashionable city of Paris, I recommend checking out the Pierre Cardin Museum.

This past year I had the opportunity to travel to Paris and one of the things that I simply had to do was go to the Pierre Cardin Museum. I had just read about the opening in the most recent issue of WWD and was mesmerized by a space that honored Monsieur Cardin. He always intrigued me and to have the opportunity to see a variety of items he created over the span of his career was on the top of my to-do list for this trip.

The cost is a bit steep, but definitely worth it (25 euro). The pieces that are on display run the gamut from housewares to ready-to-wear, to couture.  I was the sole person in the museum and ended up having an impromptu tour from the woman that worked there.

Overall, the history held within the three-story museum is inspiring.

FIDM 6th Annual “Outstanding Art of Television Costume Design” Exhibition

“In its sixth year, this annual exhibition salutes the work of 2012’s Primetime Emmy® – Nominated Costume Designers and Costume Supervisors. Including over 75 costumes from a variety of television genres, this year’s exhibition will be guest curated by Mary Rose, costume designer and current president of the Costume Designers Guild. Featured television shows include Boardwalk Empire, Downton Abbey, Game of Thrones, Once Upon a Time, Pan Am, Smash, Magic City, and many more. ”

From July 31- Oct 20, 2012
Free Admission

http://fidmmuseum.org/exhibitions/current/#annual-outstanding-television-costume-design